Term 1, Week 5: MA Creative Writing Summary

Week 5 dealt with dramatic writing; that is understanding the concept of ‘character’ in dramatic writing and also to understand what it means to be characters ourselves.

The keywords for this week included (being a) character, motivation, complexity and subtext. Building on these, the themes for the week related to understanding the ways in which we are all characters, how we write with (and for) actors and also paradoxes where a character can seemingly have two conflicting traits.

A video presented by a guest tutor, Dr Paul Elsam, summarised dramatic writing really well. He stated that we often write privately for ourselves and we do have control over that but, with dramatic writing, you have to write with an expectation that someone else will get hold of your work further on through the process. Due to this, Paul suggests that what he does is ‘incomplete writing’ as he purposely leaves gaps that can be used as interpretation for others. Furthermore, there is a suggestion that we should also think about how we can leave clues in our writing for others to use when they perform, or act out, our work. It can be a fine line between actors feeling as if they’ve not got anything to work with and feelingn like they’re being preached to from the page.

Another part of the presentation discussed the use of character profile sheets as a way to model / capture the details of each of our main characters. Having spent many school holidays in the 1980’s playing Dungeons & Dragons, I felt much more at ease with this type of work (although I found the part where I had to come up with a character sheet on myself somewhat difficult.)  I use Scrivener to write a lot of my stories and I do quite often use the character sheet templates in there.

The writing exercises were a variation on the character profile sheet work extended to include characters from our own stories. Moreover, we were asked to bring two new characters together and to write a conversation between them – I enjoyed this aspect of the week and thought it tied back to the previous couple of weeks quite well. The final exercise was to free-write in the voice of a character and try to come up with a ten minute dramatic monologue.

Supporting readings and excerpts for this week include the very informative ‘what I’m really thinking’ which is a very tongue-in-cheek view at what people in certain roles actually think about their colleagues / customers but were far too polite to actually say. I do like the one about the student adviser who finished with this wonderful set of statements, ‘If you’re polite to me, I may let you bring me your application five minutes after the office officially closed. If you’re not, I probably won’t. That is a life lesson that doesn’t come in the lecture hall. Please don’t treat administrative staff as if we are less clever than you. I have a PhD, too.

I sent in a short story called, Steal of the Night, for a workspace critique. It will be interesting to read what others in the writing group think next week.

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